Publish Your Notes on Psych Yogi

Publish Your Notes on Psych Yogi

Using the below form, you can submit your notes to get them published on Psych Yogi for the world to see.

Psych Yogi is one of the UK’s most popular Psychology website aimed at students. Getting your notes and articles published on Psych Yogi looks great on CVs and on university application letters.

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Forensic Psychology Masters Programmes MSc

Forensic Psychology Masters Programmes MSc

Trying to understand the differences in the key points of various forensic psychology masters programmes can be difficult. This page lists a number of forensic psychology MSc courses and their relevant features.

Coventry University – Forensic Psychology MSc: 

Link to course: http://www.coventry.ac.uk/course-structure/health-and-life-sciences/postgraduate/forensic-psychology-msc/

Fees:

  • Full-time UK students: £6212
  • Part-time UK students: N/A
  • Full-time International students: Check with University
  • Part-time International students: N/A

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Memon and Higham (1999) – Cognitive Interview

Memon, A., & Higham, P. A. (1999). A review of the cognitive interview. Psychology, Crime and Law, 5(1-2), 177-196.

Background

This is a study you may need for your OCR H567, Applied Psychology exam. It is from the criminal psychology unit. It considers the topic: The collection and processing of forensic evidence (cognitive). The application for this study is at least one strategy for police interviews. 

For this criminal psychology unit, it is highly recommended that you read Forensic Psychology: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) to gain a deeper understanding of criminal psychology.


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Hall and Player (2008) Criminal Revision H567

Hall & Player (2008) – Fingerprint Analysis

Hall, L. J., & Player, E. (2008). Will the introduction of an emotional context affect fingerprint analysis and decision-making?. Forensic Science International, 181(1), 36-39.

Background

This is a study you may need for your OCR H567, Applied Psychology exam. It is from the criminal psychology unit. It considers the topic: The collection and processing of forensic evidence (biological). The application for this study is at least one strategy for reducing bias in the collection and processing of forensic evidence. 

For this criminal psychology unit, it is highly recommended that you read Forensic Psychology: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) to gain a deeper understanding of criminal psychology.

It is accepted that an expert in any discipline, as opposed to a novice, is able to demonstrate their increased competencies and cognitive processing skills, which have been enhanced with extensive training and practice. It is often said ‘that practice makes perfect’.
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Raine et al (1997)

Raine et al (1997) – Brain Abnormalities in Murderers

Raine, A., Buchsbaum, M., & LaCasse, L. (1997). Brain abnormalities in murderers indicated by positron emission tomography. Biological psychiatry,42(6), 495-508.

Background

This is a study you may need for your OCR H567, Applied Psychology exam. It is from the criminal psychology unit. It considers the topic: What makes a criminal (biological). The application for this study is at least one biological strategy for preventing criminal behaviour. 

Several previous research studies have suggested that damage to the pre-frontal cortex may cause individuals to become increased in impulsivity, immaturity. It may also caused altered emotionality, loss of self-control and the inability to modify behaviour. The combination of all of these behavioural deficits may lead to increased aggressive behaviour (Damasio, Tranel & Damasio. 1990; Weiger and Bear 1988).

Damasio et al. (1990) suggested that after damage to the pre-frontal cortex, previously normal individuals would display behaviour which would be considered abnormal and they would display deficits in decision making and planning.
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